Tag Archives: tax

Many Politicians Are Two-Faced When It Comes To Tariffs

As I write this, POTUS Donald Trump is pledging to begin tariffs on Mexico for its accused lack of assistance in the immigration crisis on the southern border of the US. Here is a quick news account from Politico:

The White House pledged on Thursday to charge ahead on tariffs on Mexico, saying the U.S. position “has not changed” after officials met for a second day to address the steady flow of Central American migrants trying to enter the United States.

Talks between Mexican and U.S. officials at the White House wrapped up without resolution. Several key officials in the administration were unavailable for negotiations. President Donald Trump was in France for the 75th anniversary of the D-Day invasion, and both Vice President Mike Pence and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo were on the road.

A tax plan that would promote economic growth

Both halves of Congress are trying to create a more fair tax plan that will promote growth and simplify the code. I am skeptical that anything will get done though as it appears that this Congress is incapable of doing anything significant.

Since Congress will almost certainly fail, I thought I would put my suggestion on the table. As I analyze it, it is probably the most likely plan that I have ever seen to encourage employment growth.

The first step is to not change anything for individuals except to increase the amount of money saved in long-term savings without tax penalty. This should be doubled from its present rate. The government is in the retirement business, and it isn’t doing a sufficient job of managing it. The government needs to get out of the retirement business because the government can rarely do something well. Social Security is a broken plan, and we all know it – we just need to transition out of the retirement business slowly so that we do not screw up the American workers that depend on Social Security.

Democrats want lower corporate taxes just not under Trump

Don’t let the current partisan bickering on corporate taxes make it seem like both sides of the aisle don’t want this. It is good for America and everyone that understands economics understands this. The issue is that when the Democrats held power, they couldn’t effectively do this because their liberal wing (i.e. the people that do not understand economics) would crucify them in the election booth.

Suddenly, an idea that has been accepted by economists and by policymakers on both sides of the political aisle—that high taxes on business hurt investment, workers, and the economy—is considered “absurd.”

In 2012, President Obama and his advisers proposed lowering the corporate tax rate because it “creates good jobs with good wages for the middle-class folks who work at those businesses.” In 2013, Lawrence Summers, President Clinton’s Treasury secretary and chairman of Mr. Obama’s Economic Council, argued that the tax on corporate profits creates a burden without commensurate revenues for the government and that changing it “is as close to a free lunch as tax reformers will ever get.”

Capital gains should be counted as wages–to a point

warren.buffet.secretary.caption_picIf you pay attention to the news, you have heard Warren Buffet claim that he pays a lower tax rate than his secretary. This pronouncement has prompted President Barack Hussein Obama to propose new taxes, affectionately nicknamed “Buffet taxes” or the “Buffet Rule.”

The “Buffet Rule” is going to get a lot of press attention in the coming weeks and it will get more attention if Mitt Romney successfully wins the nomination of the Republican Party.

MittRomneyProfilePicAt this writing, Mitt Romney is running for the Republican nomination and at some time he is probably going to have to divulge his finances more fully than he has already. Mr. Romney doesn’t appear to have a wage-earning job, therefore, his daily spending on clothes, food, mortgage, and hair-styling products comes from interest, capital gains, or dividend income from his earned fortune. It appears that Mr. Romney paid less than 15% on his income where a wage earner would pay a much higher rate.

First thoughts on the day after election

The massive mid-term election of 2010 is now over. My phone won’t ring 25 times today with some computer imploring me to vote for one candidate over another. The signs that are all along the streets in my town can come down (hopefully the candidates come out and clean up their mess). Life can now go back to some sort of normal.

The Republicans evidently picked up approximately 60 seats in the House of Representatives. They also made major increases in the Senate and that house appears to be split nearly 50/50 (the exact count probably won’t be known for a couple days as Alaska will probably take a while to count due to the write-in candidate).