Category Archives: Politics

Trump’s White House Mess

 

I couldn’t agree more with one of the recent editorials on the WSJ – especially the last part:
The new White House chief of staff can improve matters but it’s unlikely to be much of a change. And then there’s the question of how long any improvement will last. We’ve seen brief bouts of normalcy from this president before. Staff changes will only get Mr. Trump so far. The problem with his administration isn’t the administrators.

Source: Trump’s White House Mess

Mandatory minimums on drug crimes isn’t racist but Congress can still do better

 

Jeff Sessions’s policy won’t lock up harmless stoners, but it will help dismantle drug-trafficking networks.

While I personally believe that drug use should be decriminalized and managed by the ATF (probably with a slight rename), I also believe that laws should be enforced as written. If Congress chooses to continue to create a black market for drugs, then the law enforcement professionals are duty-bound to enforce those laws.

I truly believe that crime would drop if drugs were licensed with the production and selling of those drugs was monitored, managed, and TAXED.

Calling Mr. Sessions a racist because he has chosen to follow the laws that are written by Congress is absolute foolishness and probably partisanship.

Here are a few salient facts that I have copied from various points in a recent WSJ article. I encourage my reader to click through to the linked article.

Some of my thoughts on the problems with North Korea

The United States cannot right the world’s wrongs. For the most part (there are exceptions), we will have to step in when those wrongs influence other nations though.

So when North Korea threatens to attack South Korea or Japan, that is a problem. Especially when we agreed to protect both countries from attack by treaty. They exist in their present form because of the US. So when Obama, Bush, and Clinton do an ostrich in the sand to North Korea, that is a big problem.

It is the responsibility of the United States to protect both countries because we have a treaty that says that we will. As long as the Kim family is only cruel to their own people, then we can leave them alone. When the Kim family and the leading generals of North Korea threaten the safety of Japan and South Korea, then it is equivalent to threatening the US.

Sweden’s embrace of refugees isn’t working and the US should learn from their mistakes

 

Excellent article for anyone that is interested in the challenges of integrating a disenfranchised people into a culture and economy that they are not familiar with and are not prepared for.

Please read the article in the Source below but here are a few highlights:

The effects are palpable, starting with national security. An estimated 300 Swedish citizens with immigrant backgrounds have traveled to the Middle East to fight for Islamic State. Many are now returning to Sweden and are being welcomed back with open arms by our socialist government. In December 2010 we had our first suicide attack on Swedish soil, when an Islamic terrorist tried to blow up hundreds of civilians in central Stockholm while they were shopping for Christmas presents. Thankfully the bomber killed only himself.

Foreign Countries Freeload on U.S. Drug Research and Drive Up Costs for American Consumers

Because foreign countries can import new U.S. drugs and price them however they see fit, many have largely checked out of the innovation business themselves. The U.S. produced 57% of the world’s new medicines between 2001 and 2010, up from less than a third in the 1970s, the Milken Institute reported in 2011.

The bottom line is that foreign countries freeload off American medical innovation, enjoying the fruits of U.S. ingenuity while forcing American consumers to shoulder a disproportionate share of the burden of funding research – effectively causing the American consumer to subsidize the pharmaceutical needs of foreign consumers.

President Trump says American companies have been getting “systematically ripped off” by foreign governments and firms. He’s right. Yet he has backed a proposal that would make the problem even worse—permitting Americans to buy prescription drugs from overseas retailers, a practice known as importation. This policy wouldn’t help American consumers much, but it would gut American pharmaceutical companies.